President Kenyatta breaks silence, assures the transition process will be smooth

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President Uhuru Kenyatta has reassured Kenyans that the process of transition will be smooth as he prepares to exit office after a 10-year run.

Despite not yet publicly congratulating Ruto, President Kenyatta broke his silence on the matter when he met and held talks with religious leaders who paid him a courtesy call at State House, Nairobi, on Thursday.

President Uhuru Kenyatta on Thursday met and held talks with religious leaders at State House, Nairobi who paid him a courtesy call.

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The interfaith group, including Archbishop Martin Kivuva of Mombasa Catholic Archdiocese, Archbishop Antony Muheria of Nyeri, Anglican Archbishop Jackson Ole Sapit and the Deputy Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Kenya Muslims (SUPKEM) Hassan Ole Naado, commended President Kenyatta for his leadership which has ensured peace, stability and cohesion amongst the Kenyan communities.
The religious leaders expressed gratitude to the Head of State for working towards a united Kenya by creating a path of inclusivity for all Kenyans.
Other members of the clergy who attended the meeting included Sheikh Yusuf Nasur Maki, Nairobi Catholic Archdiocese, Archbishop Philip Anyolo, Bishop Emeritus David Oginde, Bishop Emeritus Silas Yego, Bishop Robert Langat, Canon Chris Kinyanjui and Father Ferdinard Lugonzo.




Kenyatta has remained publicly silent since the Aug. 9 vote, adding to the anxiety as Kenya again faces post-election uncertainty and a likely court challenge by the losing candidate, Raila Odinga. Coons, leading a congressional delegation on a five-country Africa visit, was in Kenya in part to meet the key parties and urge that calm continue.
Kenyatta had backed longtime rival and opposition leader Odinga in the close race against his own deputy president, William Ruto, who fell out bitterly with Kenyatta years ago. Ruto on Monday was declared the winner, but not before Kenya’s most peaceful election ever slid into chaos in the final moments.
The electoral commission split in two, each side accusing the other of trying to tinker with the results. It came as a shock to many Kenyans after an election widely seen as the country’s most transparent ever, with results from the more than 46,000 polling stations posted online.




Now Odinga almost certainly will challenge the results in Supreme Court. His campaign has seven days from Monday’s declaration to do so, and the court will have 14 days to rule. Odinga has urged supporters to remain patient instead of taking to the streets in a country with a history of sometimes deadly post-election violence.

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