Uganda welcomes grandeur art exhibition: Art pieces painted over 500 years on display

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A lot of historical art facts have been shipped into the country as the Uganda Museum is set host an extraordinary art exhibition dubbed Leonardo Opera Omnia.



For the first time in Uganda and Africa, Art pieces painted over 500 years ago by Italian Artiste Leonardo da Vinci will be displayed Uganda.
According to organizers, all is set for the highly anticipated exhibition that starts on 19th November 2019 and ends on 5th, January 2020.



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During the official opening on 19th November 2019 the entrance to the Museum will be free to the public and for those who will be attending later will be paying the usual Museum fees.
The exhibition dubbed Leonardo Opera Omnia is an innovative and ambitious project, born from a collaboration between the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation and RAI (the Italian Public Television), to commemorate the 500th anniversary of Leonardo Da Vinci’s death.



The Italian Ambassador in Kampala HE. Massimiliano Mazzanti says all proceeds from the exhibition will donated to Katalemwa Cheshire home a rehabilitation service charity centre for people with disabilities in Uganda.
Leonardo da Vinci was a Renaissance painter, sculptor, architect, inventor, military engineer and draftsman the epitome of a true Renaissance man.
Gifted with a curious mind and a brilliant intellect, da Vinci studied the laws of science and nature, which greatly informed his work.



His drawings, paintings and other works have influenced countless artists and engineers over the centuries.
It is now 500 years since Italian famed artiste Leonardo Da’ Vinci died but his art pieces still hold a record artistry value on earth that even his art piece Salvator Mundi a depiction of Jesus Christ holding a crystal orb is the most expensive painting in the world valued at $450.3 Million.



Around 1495, Ludovico Sforza, then the Duke of Milan, commissioned da Vinci to paint “The Last Supper” on the back wall of the dining hall inside the monastery of Milan’s Santa Maria delle Grazie.
The masterpiece, which took approximately three years to complete, captures the drama of the moment when Jesus informs the Twelve Apostles gathered for Passover dinner that one of them would soon betray him.



The range of facial expressions and the body language of the figures around the table bring the masterful composition to life.

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