U.S. Mission supports biodiversity and conservation in L. Mburo National park

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On April 10, U.S. Ambassador to Uganda Deborah R. Malac participated in a ceremony with Ugandan officials to mark the official handover of the newly renovated Lake Mburo Conservation Education Centre, a project funded with assistance from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Joining Ambassador Malac at the handover ceremony were the Minister of Tourism, Wildlife, and Antiquities Ephraim Kamuntu, Uganda Wildlife Authority and Kiruhura district officials, and community representatives.



In her remarks, the Ambassador emphasized how protecting the environment could contribute to Uganda’s future development and prosperity. Ambassador Malac noted that protected areas like Lake Mburo National Park “can help reduce the risk from natural disasters, counter the effects of climate change, and maintain ecosystem services.”

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She added that parks and other nature reserves also “play a crucial role in ensuring food security, providing economic opportunities, and maintaining healthy populations.”

The Lake Mburo Conservation Education Centre, originally built in 1998 with USAID funding, supports the Uganda Wildlife Authority’s efforts to promote conservation and educate both local communities and visiting students on the importance of environmental protection.



The Centre engages in conservation and outreach programs targeting Ugandan youth, who are key actors in sustaining the country’s environment and endangered wildlife populations. Lake Mburo National Park receives more than 20,000 student visitors each year.

The refurbished Education Centre will assist UWA in educating a new generation of Ugandans on how to protect the country’s diverse natural heritage with educational and interactive programming. The U.S. support to the Centre includes a solar power system, conservation education materials, and information technology equipment that will assist outreach activities.



The United States government has supported biodiversity conservation work in Uganda since the 1980s. Currently, the USAID/Uganda Biodiversity Program, implemented by the African Wildlife Foundation, supports UWA in improving its capacity to manage protected areas, develop infrastructure for monitoring, and raise awareness about natural resources as a heritage that helps improve livelihoods.

This five-year, $11.6 million program seeks to achieve sustainable biodiversity conservation and local economic growth in targeted areas of Uganda.

participated in a ceremony with Ugandan officials to mark the official handover of the newly renovated Lake Mburo Conservation Education Centre, a project funded with assistance from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Joining Ambassador Malac at the handover ceremony were the Minister of Tourism, Wildlife, and Antiquities Ephraim Kamuntu, Uganda Wildlife Authority and Kiruhura district officials, and community representatives.



In her remarks, the Ambassador emphasized how protecting the environment could contribute to Uganda’s future development and prosperity. Ambassador Malac noted that protected areas like Lake Mburo National Park “can help reduce the risk from natural disasters, counter the effects of climate change, and maintain ecosystem services.”

She added that parks and other nature reserves also “play a crucial role in ensuring food security, providing economic opportunities, and maintaining healthy populations.”

The Lake Mburo Conservation Education Centre, originally built in 1998 with USAID funding, supports the Uganda Wildlife Authority’s efforts to promote conservation and educate both local communities and visiting students on the importance of environmental protection.



The Centre engages in conservation and outreach programs targeting Ugandan youth, who are key actors in sustaining the country’s environment and endangered wildlife populations. Lake Mburo National Park receives more than 20,000 student visitors each year.

The refurbished Education Centre will assist UWA in educating a new generation of Ugandans on how to protect the country’s diverse natural heritage with educational and interactive programming. The U.S. support to the Centre includes a solar power system, conservation education materials, and information technology equipment that will assist outreach activities.



The United States government has supported biodiversity conservation work in Uganda since the 1980s. Currently, the USAID/Uganda Biodiversity Program, implemented by the African Wildlife Foundation, supports UWA in improving its capacity to manage protected areas, develop infrastructure for monitoring, and raise awareness about natural resources as a heritage that helps improve livelihoods.

This five-year, $11.6 million program seeks to achieve sustainable biodiversity conservation and local economic growth in targeted areas of Uganda.




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